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Regulatory

Governments and policymakers release new regulations all the time. This can clearly have a major impact on your general business activity – especially as it’s a challenge just to keep up with all the changes, let alone understand them.   ​

At Vistra, we have dedicated legal and regulatory change teams working around the globe, closely tracking and interpreting those regulations day-by-day, and who fully understand the risk and impact they may have on business activity. This puts us on the frontline of solutions for you.​

Whether digesting new policy from the G20 or G7 international forums and local government, or interpreting legislation in various jurisdictions, our experts are equipped to advise you at an early stage, to identify relevance and react to present and future regulatory changes that affect your business. ​

We may find ourselves drafting regulation-specific agreements, liaising with regulators on your behalf, or developing a classification service, legal opinions, and advisory solutions relating to economic substance and FACTA/CRS legislation. ​

We can also provide advice and guidance on the continuing evolution of the Directive of Administration and Cooperation (DAC); draft solutions for Brexit, tariff and trade agreements; draft transfer policy agreements; and provide advice and guidance on the taxonomy of sustainable finance in the face of climate change. ​

Whatever your regulatory concerns, we’ll move fast to build protections that are right for you.  

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