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Indirect Tax Returns

If you conduct commercial activity in a given country, then you may have to apply an indirect tax – such as a value-added tax – to goods and services you supply there. And you may have to pay those taxes on goods and services you purchase in country too. ​

You’ll then have to declare this information to the relevant tax authority by filing tax returns, and either pay the indirect taxes you’ve withheld from customers or claim a refund of those taxes your business has incurred on purchases. Simple enough in principle, but a real headache in practice. ​

At Vistra, our teams of tax compliance specialists will give you the best advice on precisely what information your business has to report and how, and on how to accurately calculate your indirect tax liabilities/refunds, anywhere in the world.​

We can help you complete all indirect tax returns and file them with the local tax authority. And we can complete any other filings relating to the local reporting of sales and purchases of goods and services, from EU Sales Listings to customs declarations. ​

Our indirect tax return service supports you wherever you’re carrying out your business. We’ll provide you with local knowledge and up-to-date information on your local indirect tax compliance obligations. And through our dedicated workflow and deadline management tool, the Global Compliance Application, you’ll get complete visibility of all your indirect tax filing obligations across the globe, as well as real-time status reports on how they’re progressing. ​

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