More content

More content

Results 1 - 9 of 33
Hiring independent contractors when expanding internationally may seem like a simple, safe and cost-effective solution to testing a new market. But each country has its own laws related to hiring and paying workers, and falling foul of them can lead to serious penalties.
Multinationals everywhere have embraced remote work, but the practice comes with risks, particularly if you pay workers across borders. With remote work, your organisation may trigger compliance obligations related to corporate tax, social security, work permits, insurance, data transfers and more. You may also need to revise your compensation and other policies.
On 19 February, the UK Supreme Court handed down a decision about the worker status of UK Uber drivers. The case first came before a judge in 2016, and many UK employers and workers had been eagerly awaiting the decision.
On 24 December 2020, just days before the end of the Brexit transition period, British and European Parliaments ratified the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement.
Singapore employers must report their employees’ remuneration in accordance with the country’s Income Tax Act. Unfortunately, reporting income is not always a straight-forward exercise, particularly when an employer has implemented comprehensive employee-compensation programmes.
“Nobody got fired for hiring IBM,” is an old saying that speaks to corporate risk aversion and the importance of reputation when choosing a vendor, among other things.
Employer policies have long been based on the idea that allowing employees to work from home decreases productivity.
The ongoing digital revolution has accelerated this year as employers everywhere turn to remote working in response to the pandemic.
If your organization sends employees abroad, you need to understand what a shadow payroll is and how it works.